Do This, But Don't Do That: Septic Drain Field Care Guidelines Homeowners Need

After we moved into our home, I realized that there were a few problems with the plumbing. It seemed like no matter what we did, the plumbing was having problems, and I knew it had to be because of our septic system. After carefully evaluating the system, we realized that there were some maintenance issues that we were still struggling with. We started making little changes, and before I knew it, things were moving along a lot better. I wanted to create a blog all about septic services so that other people would know how to resolve challenges early. Check it out!

Do This, But Don't Do That: Septic Drain Field Care Guidelines Homeowners Need

9 November 2018
 Categories: , Blog


Homeowners probably don't give a lot of thought to the health of their septic drain field, but they should. The septic drain field is, perhaps, the most important component of the entire on-site septic system. If it should fail for any reason, the septic tank will soon fill to the top and create a scenario in which wastewater and solids begin to back up into the home. Homeowners who want to reduce the risk of finding a flood of sewage coming up from the drains and toilets in their home can use this simple list as a guide for keeping their drain field working efficiently. 

Do learn where your drain field pipes are located

In order to protect your drain field, you first have to know where it is located. If you have had the system installed or repaired during your occupancy of the home, your septic installer will be able to provide a general drawing. Other sources can include the previous owners, your local health department, or the plat or survey of your land or lot. 

Don't endanger the drain field by compressing the soil

One of the main reasons that homeowners need to know where their drain field is located is so they can be diligent about the activities that take place on the soil that covers it. Since compressing the soil in the area where the perforated pipes are tasked with draining the effluent into the soil will hinder the action of the system, any activities that will compress the soil, both instantly and over time, must be prevented. These might include: 

  • Turning the area into a playground or sports field for kids 
  • Housing livestock, such as sheep, horses, or cattle 
  • Parking vehicles, including boats and campers 
  • Using a large tractor to mow the area
  • Extending a driveway through the area

While infrequent foot traffic should not be a problem, soil compaction can occur quickly when the drain field is used daily for human use or any other type of traffic. 

Do forego activities that disturb the soil

Because of the potential for damaging the pipes and connections of the system, as well as adding to soil compaction issues, homeowners will also want to avoid any activities that will disturb the soil in the area of their drain fields. Activities like planting trees, tilling a garden plot, or digging holes to install yard ornaments, flag poles, and other items should be avoided. 

To learn more about protecting your drain field or to discuss a problem or concern, homeowners can contact a reputable septic contractor in their area. 

About Me
Resolving Septic System Issues Early

After we moved into our home, I realized that there were a few problems with the plumbing. It seemed like no matter what we did, the plumbing was having problems, and I knew it had to be because of our septic system. After carefully evaluating the system, we realized that there were some maintenance issues that we were still struggling with. We started making little changes, and before I knew it, things were moving along a lot better. I wanted to create a blog all about septic services so that other people would know how to resolve challenges early. Check it out!

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